Make 2017 a year of promise for the hungry and homeless in Chicagoland.

Bed & Bread Club: Restoring Hope in Chicagoland

It’s more than just a meal or a room. A membership in the Bed & Bread Club helps bring hope to the hopeless, and change for those who once thought it impossible. Read these stories and discover the ways the Bed & Bread Club has helped hungry and homeless individuals throughout Chicagoland.

During Summer, Kids Miss Out On Daily Meals

For children everywhere the end of school means the start of summer. A chance to hang out with friends, go swimming or do nothing at all. It’s usually a time of great joy. But for some children from low-income families, the end of the school year means saying goodbye to school feeding programs which provide them with at least one solid meal a day. In fact, according to a recent study, only 15 percent of children from low-income families in Illinois receive summer meals.

The Salvation Army offers summer feeding programs at its corps community centers to make sure area children don’t go hungry. “The Salvation Army has long led the way to combat hunger — we operate food pantries in our corps, host holiday meals, deliver meals to seniors and more,” said Captain Nikki Hughes, corps officer at The Salvation Army Adele and Robert Stern Red Shield Center in the Englewood neighborhood. “The lunch program at the Red Shield Center during the summer is a natural extension of this outreach and an important one to those who children and families who turn to the school system for help during the rest of the year. Children should not go hungry just because school is out for the summer.”

Supporting Chicago’s Vulnerable Seniors

Evelyn Anderson’s office is everywhere. While she has a desk and a chair in an Englewood office building, her real work is done in homes throughout the city of Chicago. For nearly two decades, she has worked for the men and women who are most in need of support.

“I give my heart and soul every day,” she said. “That’s the only way to do this job. You have to give it your all, all the time, or it just doesn’t work. If there’s no trust, there’s no relationship, and then you can’t help make things better.”

Anderson makes home visits to seniors throughout Chicagoland, performing well-being checks and connecting seniors to support services such as public transit, in-home care, Meals on Wheels and senior health insurance programs. By connecting with local support services, the seniors can remain independent and safely live in their homes for a longer period of time.

If support services do not provide enough safety for the seniors to remain in their homes, Anderson helps them identify other residential options in the area, including living with family members, assisted living, low-cost senior housing or nursing homes. In extreme cases, Anderson has had to have clients admitted to hospitals or moved from their homes for their own safety and well-being.

“Sometimes I can only offer temporary help, but I can start the conversation about more long-range planning,” Anderson said. “I know I’ve done my best when they feel comfortable with a plan. And when they give me a hug. Sometimes a hug says it all.”

Even though she is a tireless advocate, Anderson doesn’t do it all on her own. She works coordinates services with other agencies, including the Chicago Police Department, the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services, Illinois Department on Aging, Oak Street Health and other social service organizations.

“We really work best when we come together as a city for the seniors,” Anderson said. “We owe it to our elders to be kind, to be honest and to be supportive.”

Keeping Families in Their Homes

Miranda is a single mother to three young children. She was employed and worked hard to support her family. But when she entered the hospital for a medical procedure, her life changed forever. There were complications with her surgery and she fell into a coma for several days. Ultimately, she lost a leg to amputation.

When she woke, Miranda found that due to her disability, she would be unable to perform her job duties. She was forced to apply for disability benefits. With modest child support and disability benefits not yet approved, Miranda fell behind on rent and utilities and had nothing for her children on Christmas morning.

She felt alone and forgotten. “I was going to die,” Miranda says. “I have three kids and nobody was there to help take care of them. I was so angry.”

That’s when she turned to The Salvation Army’s Pathway of Hope. For families like Miranda’s, who are already living on limited means and hovering on the brink of homelessness, a job loss, medical emergency or other issues can turn a difficult situation into a crisis. When this happens, Pathway of Hope caseworkers help families identify specific barriers to self-sufficiency, and ways to move past them. Then, together, they create an action plan for success.

Miranda’s caseworker at The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center not only worked with her to secure rent and utility payments, but also helped her obtain stable housing, reliable transportation and Christmas gifts for her children. The Salvation Army also provided her healthy food and helped purchase modest furniture.

Miranda now lives five minutes from the Kroc Center, in an apartment with her children. She is a member of the Corps church, and has found a solid support system to help her overcome her last few barriers.

“I’m grateful for how God has worked everything out for us,” she says. “Now that I’m getting back on my feet — literally — I plan on being there to welcome others to the Pathway of Hope, to the Kroc and to my God.”

A Mother and Son Find a Fresh Start

This is Maria’s story, in her own words…

Due to a violent living situation, I was forced to leave home with my young son, Ryan, to live in a shelter. The staff there encouraged me to ask others for help, to find a church and seek counseling. Women living at the shelter told me about a terrific organization that helps those like us: The Salvation Army.

After relocating to northwest Indiana, I visited the East Chicago, Indiana Corps for help furnishing my apartment. There I met a wonderful woman named Rosemary. As she listened to my problems, I began to feel a sense of relief — the weight of the world was no longer on my shoulders.

Rosemary helped me resolve a problem with my mother who was being difficult about letting us reclaim our belongings. Thanks to Rosemary’s persistence, we were able to pick up our possessions. Ryan got back his clothes, toys and all the other things so important to a small boy. He attended summer day camp at the Corps and made many new friendships that continued into the school year.

I also made new friendships and started attending Bible studies, women’s ministries and classes in nutrition, exercise and music! This never would’ve happened if it weren’t for great people like Rosemary and Captains Daniel and Nivia Paredes (then Corps officers), who devoted their time and efforts to help us.

When I first came to The Salvation Army for help, I felt like a piece of gum under somebody’s shoe. Now I feel a sense of pride and accomplishment. The Corps is a home for Ryan and me, a place where we’re known on a first-name basis!


Maria and Cadet Leta Marin, who leads the East Chicago, Ind., Corps with husband Lt. Abraham Marin, Corps officer.

Make 2017 a year of promise for the hungry and homeless in Chicagoland.

Bed & Bread Club: Restoring Hope in Chicagoland

It’s more than just a meal or a room. A membership in the Bed & Bread Club helps bring hope to the hopeless, and change for those who once thought it impossible. Read these stories and discover the ways the Bed & Bread Club has helped hungry and homeless individuals throughout Chicagoland.

During Summer, Kids Miss Out On Daily Meals

For children everywhere the end of school means the start of summer. A chance to hang out with friends, go swimming or do nothing at all. It’s usually a time of great joy. But for some children from low-income families, the end of the school year means saying goodbye to school feeding programs which provide them with at least one solid meal a day. In fact, according to a recent study, only 15 percent of children from low-income families in Illinois receive summer meals.

The Salvation Army offers summer feeding programs at its corps community centers to make sure area children don’t go hungry. “The Salvation Army has long led the way to combat hunger — we operate food pantries in our corps, host holiday meals, deliver meals to seniors and more,” said Captain Nikki Hughes, corps officer at The Salvation Army Adele and Robert Stern Red Shield Center in the Englewood neighborhood. “The lunch program at the Red Shield Center during the summer is a natural extension of this outreach and an important one to those who children and families who turn to the school system for help during the rest of the year. Children should not go hungry just because school is out for the summer.”

Supporting Chicago’s Vulnerable Seniors

Evelyn Anderson’s office is everywhere. While she has a desk and a chair in an Englewood office building, her real work is done in homes throughout the city of Chicago. For nearly two decades, she has worked for the men and women who are most in need of support.

“I give my heart and soul every day,” she said. “That’s the only way to do this job. You have to give it your all, all the time, or it just doesn’t work. If there’s no trust, there’s no relationship, and then you can’t help make things better.”

Anderson makes home visits to seniors throughout Chicagoland, performing well-being checks and connecting seniors to support services such as public transit, in-home care, Meals on Wheels and senior health insurance programs. By connecting with local support services, the seniors can remain independent and safely live in their homes for a longer period of time.

If support services do not provide enough safety for the seniors to remain in their homes, Anderson helps them identify other residential options in the area, including living with family members, assisted living, low-cost senior housing or nursing homes. In extreme cases, Anderson has had to have clients admitted to hospitals or moved from their homes for their own safety and well-being.

“Sometimes I can only offer temporary help, but I can start the conversation about more long-range planning,” Anderson said. “I know I’ve done my best when they feel comfortable with a plan. And when they give me a hug. Sometimes a hug says it all.”

Even though she is a tireless advocate, Anderson doesn’t do it all on her own. She works coordinates services with other agencies, including the Chicago Police Department, the Chicago Department of Family and Support Services, Illinois Department on Aging, Oak Street Health and other social service organizations.

“We really work best when we come together as a city for the seniors,” Anderson said. “We owe it to our elders to be kind, to be honest and to be supportive.”

Keeping Families in Their Homes

Miranda is a single mother to three young children. She was employed and worked hard to support her family. But when she entered the hospital for a medical procedure, her life changed forever. There were complications with her surgery and she fell into a coma for several days. Ultimately, she lost a leg to amputation.

When she woke, Miranda found that due to her disability, she would be unable to perform her job duties. She was forced to apply for disability benefits. With modest child support and disability benefits not yet approved, Miranda fell behind on rent and utilities and had nothing for her children on Christmas morning.

She felt alone and forgotten. “I was going to die,” Miranda says. “I have three kids and nobody was there to help take care of them. I was so angry.”

That’s when she turned to The Salvation Army’s Pathway of Hope. For families like Miranda’s, who are already living on limited means and hovering on the brink of homelessness, a job loss, medical emergency or other issues can turn a difficult situation into a crisis. When this happens, Pathway of Hope caseworkers help families identify specific barriers to self-sufficiency, and ways to move past them. Then, together, they create an action plan for success.

Miranda’s caseworker at The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center not only worked with her to secure rent and utility payments, but also helped her obtain stable housing, reliable transportation and Christmas gifts for her children. The Salvation Army also provided her healthy food and helped purchase modest furniture.

Miranda now lives five minutes from the Kroc Center, in an apartment with her children. She is a member of the Corps church, and has found a solid support system to help her overcome her last few barriers.

“I’m grateful for how God has worked everything out for us,” she says. “Now that I’m getting back on my feet — literally — I plan on being there to welcome others to the Pathway of Hope, to the Kroc and to my God.”

A Mother and Son Find a Fresh Start

This is Maria’s story, in her own words…

Due to a violent living situation, I was forced to leave home with my young son, Ryan, to live in a shelter. The staff there encouraged me to ask others for help, to find a church and seek counseling. Women living at the shelter told me about a terrific organization that helps those like us: The Salvation Army.

After relocating to northwest Indiana, I visited the East Chicago, Indiana Corps for help furnishing my apartment. There I met a wonderful woman named Rosemary. As she listened to my problems, I began to feel a sense of relief — the weight of the world was no longer on my shoulders.

Rosemary helped me resolve a problem with my mother who was being difficult about letting us reclaim our belongings. Thanks to Rosemary’s persistence, we were able to pick up our possessions. Ryan got back his clothes, toys and all the other things so important to a small boy. He attended summer day camp at the Corps and made many new friendships that continued into the school year.

I also made new friendships and started attending Bible studies, women’s ministries and classes in nutrition, exercise and music! This never would’ve happened if it weren’t for great people like Rosemary and Captains Daniel and Nivia Paredes (then Corps officers), who devoted their time and efforts to help us.

When I first came to The Salvation Army for help, I felt like a piece of gum under somebody’s shoe. Now I feel a sense of pride and accomplishment. The Corps is a home for Ryan and me, a place where we’re known on a first-name basis!


Maria and Cadet Leta Marin, who leads the East Chicago, Ind., Corps with husband Lt. Abraham Marin, Corps officer.

Access Previous Stories
Battling Suburban Homelessness

You won’t meet many people quite like Bill and Debbi Middendorp. Twice a week, the couple loads up their Salvation Army van to drive through Wheeling, Prospect Heights, Des Plaines and Arlington Heights, distributing sandwiches, snacks, water and hygiene items to those sleeping on the streets. In 2016, they handed out 1,400 bags of food — approximately 4,200 meals.

The men and women the Middendorps have dedicated their lives to serving, often spend their nights sleeping in tents in forest preserves, huddled under tarps next to manufacturing facilities, or in train stations and bus depots. During the day, some work at jobs that provide just enough money to purchase scant fast food meals. Others spend their days sitting in public areas until they are asked to leave.

If possible, clients are moved into more stable housing or reunited with loved ones. The Middendorps helped one man secure a management position at a local business. That man later hired another client who was homeless. They both moved into a hotel, but because they were spending a large chunk of their paychecks on shelter they were unable to make their own meals. The Middendorps helped the men purchase a mobile home. Now they’re able to pay for their home, cook their own meals and save money for future emergencies.

If the Middendorps are not able to move people from the streets into stable housing, they try to offer practical help. “We help people fill out the forms for a state ID or a social security card, or to access their benefits,” Debbi says. “It is very rare for a person to be considered for an apartment or a job without proper identification.”

According to Captain David Martinez, an officer at the Des Plaines Corps Community Center, many of those served are employed as bellringers during the Christmas season and receive holiday assistance.

The Middendorps are dedicated to their work. “We’ve enjoyed getting to know each person and their stories,” says Debbi. “They’re all unique, but often filled with hopelessness, pain and loss.”

“We want to bring them hope and love.”

Feeding Chicago’s Hungry Families

Every morning, Timothy woke up with the same haunting thought: “How am I going to feed my family today?”

Timothy is on disability assistance, and relies on The Salvation Army to help provide enough food for himself, his wife and their son. That single check must cover rent, utilities, school, medical costs and the most basic of necessities: food. For Timothy, and the 812,000 individuals in Cook County who turn to pantries for groceries, food services like ours are a Godsend.

The Salvation Army operates 28 food pantries through corps community centers which provides canned fruits and vegetables, breads, snack items, frozen meats and other food items on a monthly basis.

In addition to their regular food pantry, The Salvation Army Chicago Lawn Corps Community Center, on Chicago’s southwest side, also operates a fresh produce pantry. Recipients can select from a wide variety of seasonal items including berries, oranges, greens and more.

For people in Timothy’s position, each visit to the pantry helps relieve their tight budgets. “Every little bit helps,” Timothy says. “Thanks to The Salvation Army my family gets a meal every night with fresh produce — bananas, peppers, onions and more.”

Virginia

Virginia and her teenage twins found themselves facing eviction after she lost her job and her children lost their disability benefits. After calling many shelters throughout Chicago for availability, Virginia reached The Salvation Army Evangeline Booth Lodge. She was told The Salvation Army was able to help, and so she and her family made their way to the city. Traveling from the western suburbs, they had to take several buses, two CTA El lines and walk a mile or more just to reach the family shelter. “We were exhausted,” Virginia said. “But the staff was so kind to us. They walked us through the process, and when we needed a moment to gather our thoughts and emotions, they gave us some privacy.”

The Booth Lodge is one of the few facilities that allow entire families to remain together through such difficult times. In most other facilities, families are split up sending men and children to separate facilities. And each family has their own room with a private bathroom. “We had our own bathroom, beds and a key! We had somewhere to shower and clean up,” said Virginia. “And we could stay together. That was so important.” Virginia said that they slept so well that first night, knowing they were somewhere safe.

Today, Virginia is addressing some health issues and working to improve her job prospects. Demetrius is planning to go back to college in the spring. His twin sister, Alicia, is already attending school at nearby Olivet Nazarene University. “The staff has really been supportive of my children going to school,” said Virginia. “They made sure Alicia had what she needed for her classes and dorm room when school started this year.”

Edyta

Christmas is a time of joy and wonder. But for some, the holidays are not so joyous. Edyta and her family found themselves with nothing when the family’s construction company and restaurant failed in the aftermath of the economic downturn. The family, themselves long-time supporters of The Salvation Army, was now forced to turn to others for help with basic necessities.

Edyta visited the Norridge Corps Community Center to inquire about the food pantry program. After meeting with the staff members and sharing her story, she was told that not only would her family be eligible for the food pantry program, but they would also receive a holiday meal basket with a ham and all the sides.

For the first time in two years, there would be a holiday meal and presents under the tree. There would be a happy Christmas in their home. “I was so overwhelmed with the kindness and understanding,” Edyta said.

The Salvation Army continues to support Edyta’s family as they work to get back on their feet. “I am so grateful for the help,” she said. “I can’t wait until I have the opportunity to repay the generosity and help someone else.”

Sheltering Chicago’s Homeless

Ray had a great life, and a great family. Then he watched it all collapse when his wife succumbed to addiction. “My three sons mean the world to me,” he says. “So… I took the responsibility of raising them myself.” Unfortunately, this wasn’t so simple. The unexpected drop to a single income left Ray unable to support his family. With no immediate safety net in place, they lost their house.

For a while, it felt like there weren’t any options in sight. But then Ray learned about our Evangeline Booth Lodge. “By the grace of God, we ended up at The Salvation Army. It was there that we were offered a second chance.”

Upon entering the shelter, Ray was able to enroll his sons in school and day care, which freed up time for him to look for work. Within a few weeks, he had found steady work. After saving up a small amount of money, the family moved into a new apartment. “As my boys and I were walking to our new apartment,” Ray recalls, “I turned back to the shelter and raised my hands in the air and yelled, ‘Thank you Salvation Army!’”

According to the City of Chicago’s Department of Family and Support Services (DFSS), in 2016, there were 5,800 homeless individuals like Ray and his family within the city limits.

The Salvation Army Evangeline Booth Lodge is one of Chicago’s only family shelters, keeping parents and children together during a time of intense crisis. The shelter provides a home for as many as 220 parents and children each night. Additionally, Booth Lodge also provides food, clothing, housing placement and job search assistance, as well as tutoring and after-school activities for children.

Because of our history and expertise in addressing homelessness, in October 2016, DFSS named the The Salvation Army as the designated agency for conducting all assessments and referrals for families who turn to the City for help finding shelter.

“I reached out to The Salvation Army because I knew that they would be the entity that could really help the City be more responsive when it comes to providing these services,” says Alissa Rodriguez, Deputy Commissioner of Homeless Programs for the DFSS.

The Salvation Army continues to work with city officials to address other ways to coordinate services and better serve those in need now and into the future.

Nettie

For several years, Nettie Harris and her teenage son found themselves with insecure housing. Nettie lost her job as an airport dispatcher and quickly fell behind in paying bills, including the mortgage. Unable to keep their home, they moved to Indiana where Nettie pursued a new career.

Unable to find a permanent job, and with unemployment benefits running out, Nettie and her son had to move again. They lived with several different relatives and friends, and sometimes lived apart. Eventually there was nobody else to help; Nettie and her son were on their own. “I wasn’t going to let my son sleep in a car or on the street,” Nettie said.

She began searching for shelters and was referred to The Salvation Army Evangeline Booth Lodge. “I called at 9 a.m. and there were no rooms available, but a staff member called back two hours later to tell me there was room for us.”

While staying at the Booth Lodge, Nettie enrolled in a job readiness program to improve her job skills, resume and interviewing ability. Her son registered for classes at Harold Washington College. They both had medical appointments for the first time in years. “This whole process matured us,” Nettie said. They eventually moved in with Nettie’s daughter.

Today Nettie serves as an information attendant greeting visitors, answering questions and providing tours at The Salvation Army’s Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center. She recently moved into her own apartment, but says she won’t forget her struggles. “Until you’re homeless, you don’t know what it’s like to be homeless. These people are truly struggling.”

Kathy

Kathy fled North Carolina with her three young daughters because of domestic battery. She came to Chicago to stay with her cousin, and found safety and security for a few months.

A computer business analyst, she needed to earn certification in Illinois in order to secure a job in her field. But before Kathy could get back on her feet, her cousin lost her job. Eventually her cousin, Kathy and the children were all evicted. Never imagining that she would become homeless, she was referred to The Salvation Army and moved into the Evangeline Booth Lodge. The Salvation Army gave them food and shelter, and helped Kathy navigate social services and begin the process of securing permanent housing.

Today, Kathy’s children are attending a dual-language charter school, and Kathy is attending Microsoft Computer Certification classes at a community college. She will be forever thankful for the assistance of The Salvation Army. She says the adjustment has been hard, but that The Salvation Army has given her hope for the future.

redshield

The Shield of Hope

In just three months, the Bed & Bread Club has assisted thousands of Chicagoans.

people fed and sheltered through our Evangeline Booth Lodge

individuals assisted with rent, clothing, transportation, utilities and medication

meals served across metropolitan Chicago

Spread the word. Join the cause.

If you or a loved one are facing hunger or homelessness, please contact us.

Facebook

Thank you Jewel-Osco for supporting us at the Multi-Agency Response Center in Round Lake. ... See MoreSee Less

Thank you Jewel-Osco for supporting us at the Multi-Agency Response Center in Round Lake.

The Multi Agency Response Center is open today until noon to support those affected by the Lake County floods. ... See MoreSee Less

The Multi Agency Response Center is open today until noon to support those affected by the Lake County floods.

The Salvation Army Helps Residents Impacted by Floods in Lake ...
“This is a very hard time for many people as they deal with flood waters and the damage to their property. We want to make sure The Salvation Army is there not only to help with clean-up efforts, but also to offer emotional support.” - Major David Dalberg, Salvation Army Divisional Director of Emergency Disaster Services
... See MoreSee Less

Paul Riedl, Dorita Wainwright and 23 others like this

Yvonne PerezTO ALL THOSE AT THE SALVATION ARMY I THANK ALL OF YOU GOD BLESS ALL OF YOU TOO. YOU ARE ALWAY"S DOING WONDERFUL WORK...TAKE CARE...

10 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Will came in to receive flood recovery assistance at the Multi Agency Response Center and offered to volunteer for an hour. Thanks for pitching in! ... See MoreSee Less

Will came in to receive flood recovery assistance at the Multi Agency Response Center and offered to volunteer for an hour. Thanks for pitching in!

The Salvation Army Chicago Metropolitan Division added an event.

Residents impacted by the floods in Lake County can come to this one-stop, resource center in Round Lake Beach.

The Salvation Army, one of the largest direct providers of social services across Illinois, partners with Lake County officials and other disaster response agencies to set up a one-stop resource center for those impacted by the recent flooding. Residents will be able to meet with trained counselors for resources, obtain housing and insurance information and other assistance from team representatives.

As a part of “MARC”, The Salvation Army will offer and receive in-kind donations. Translators will be available.

WHERE
965 E. Rollins Road, Round Lake Beach, (The old Garden Fresh)

WHEN
Friday, July 21, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., Lunch and dinner will be provided to clients. (CLOSING EARLY DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER (rain, hail, and possible tornadoes)

Saturday, July 22, 9 a.m. – noon, Snacks will be provided to clients.

TRANSPORTATION
There will be a special PACE bus taking people from the Waukegan area to the Resource Center. Catch the bus at Catholic Charities, 671 S. Lewis Avenue, Waukegan at the following times.

Thursday - 10:00 am and 1:00 pm
Trip Friday - 10:00 am and 1:00 pm
Trip Saturday- 10:00 am Only

To learn more or to donate goods, visit www.salarmychicago.org for more details!
... See MoreSee Less

Snapchat

snapchatchicagobg

Instagram

redshield

The Shield of Hope

In just three months, the Bed & Bread Club has assisted thousands of Chicagoans.

people fed and sheltered through our Evangeline Booth Lodge

individuals assisted with rent, clothing, transportation, utilities and medication

meals served across metropolitan Chicago

Spread the word. Join the cause.

If you or a loved one are facing hunger or homelessness, please contact us.

Facebook

Thank you Jewel-Osco for supporting us at the Multi-Agency Response Center in Round Lake. ... See MoreSee Less

Thank you Jewel-Osco for supporting us at the Multi-Agency Response Center in Round Lake.

The Multi Agency Response Center is open today until noon to support those affected by the Lake County floods. ... See MoreSee Less

The Multi Agency Response Center is open today until noon to support those affected by the Lake County floods.

The Salvation Army Helps Residents Impacted by Floods in Lake ...
“This is a very hard time for many people as they deal with flood waters and the damage to their property. We want to make sure The Salvation Army is there not only to help with clean-up efforts, but also to offer emotional support.” - Major David Dalberg, Salvation Army Divisional Director of Emergency Disaster Services
... See MoreSee Less

Paul Riedl, Dorita Wainwright and 23 others like this

Yvonne PerezTO ALL THOSE AT THE SALVATION ARMY I THANK ALL OF YOU GOD BLESS ALL OF YOU TOO. YOU ARE ALWAY"S DOING WONDERFUL WORK...TAKE CARE...

10 hours ago   ·  1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Will came in to receive flood recovery assistance at the Multi Agency Response Center and offered to volunteer for an hour. Thanks for pitching in! ... See MoreSee Less

Will came in to receive flood recovery assistance at the Multi Agency Response Center and offered to volunteer for an hour. Thanks for pitching in!

The Salvation Army Chicago Metropolitan Division added an event.

Residents impacted by the floods in Lake County can come to this one-stop, resource center in Round Lake Beach.

The Salvation Army, one of the largest direct providers of social services across Illinois, partners with Lake County officials and other disaster response agencies to set up a one-stop resource center for those impacted by the recent flooding. Residents will be able to meet with trained counselors for resources, obtain housing and insurance information and other assistance from team representatives.

As a part of “MARC”, The Salvation Army will offer and receive in-kind donations. Translators will be available.

WHERE
965 E. Rollins Road, Round Lake Beach, (The old Garden Fresh)

WHEN
Friday, July 21, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., Lunch and dinner will be provided to clients. (CLOSING EARLY DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER (rain, hail, and possible tornadoes)

Saturday, July 22, 9 a.m. – noon, Snacks will be provided to clients.

TRANSPORTATION
There will be a special PACE bus taking people from the Waukegan area to the Resource Center. Catch the bus at Catholic Charities, 671 S. Lewis Avenue, Waukegan at the following times.

Thursday - 10:00 am and 1:00 pm
Trip Friday - 10:00 am and 1:00 pm
Trip Saturday- 10:00 am Only

To learn more or to donate goods, visit www.salarmychicago.org for more details!
... See MoreSee Less

Snapchat

snapchatchicagobg

Instagram

Share This